UNICEF Aotearoa

UNICEF Aotearoa

Tamariki are at the
heart of our mahi

We protect children’s lives wherever they are,
defend their rights and help them realise their potential.

UNICEF works in 191 countries and territories. For 75 years we have been at the forefront of humanitarian crises, armed conflict and natural disasters to protect children. Together with partners, we are vaccinating, educating and protecting more children than any other organisation.

In Aotearoa we are committed to improving the lives of tamariki (children) and rangatahi (youth) and ensuring their voices are heard. As UNICEF Aotearoa (New Zealand), we show our respect to all tamariki regardless of ethnicity, age or social background.



We protect children’s lives wherever they are, defend their rights and help them realise their potential.

UNICEF works in 191 countries and territories. For 75 years we have been at the forefront of humanitarian crises, armed conflict and natural disasters to protect children. Together with partners, we are vaccinating, educating and protecting more children than any other organisation.

In Aotearoa we are committed to improving the lives of tamariki (children) and rangatahi (youth) and ensuring their voices are heard. As UNICEF Aotearoa (New Zealand), we show our respect to all tamariki regardless of ethnicity, age or social background.



Tamariki are at the
heart of our mahi

Our role as UNICEF Aotearoa is to be kaitiaki o ngā uri o āpōpō.
Guardians of the generations of tomorrow.



We are committed to honouring Te Tiriti o Waitangi (the Treaty of Waitangi) and recognise the status of Māori as Tangata whenua, as well as the need for organisations such as ours (Tangata Tiriti) to work together with Māori in partnership for outcomes in the participation, potential and, protection of all Tamariki and Rangatahi throughout Aotearoa.

We support te reo Māori revitalisation  and want to ensure that te reo Māori is more visible, particularly for our tamariki and rangatahi (young people). We also value the importance of a Tikanga based approach in how we engage with Māori; and appreciate the significant role and connection Māori share within whānau, hapū and Iwi systems.

Our goal is to convey in a powerful and unique way, what UNICEF Aotearoa stands for. We’re standing up for children’s rights in everything we do. It’s about equalityinclusion and recognising that culture is a taonga (treasure) to be cherished.

In Aotearoa, you'll now see us using our new name
UNICEF Aotearoa | mo nga tamariki katoa

We are proud to unveil a new name and brand identity, reflecting the mahi we do every day to protect tamariki in Aotearoa, the Pacific and around the world.

Our new name

Our role as UNICEF Aotearoa is to be kaitiaki o ngā uri o āpōpō.
Guardians of the generations of tomorrow.


We support te reo Māori revitalisation  and want to ensure that te reo Māori is more visible, particularly for our tamariki and rangatahi (young people). We also value the importance of a Tikanga based approach in how we engage with Māori; and appreciate the significant role and connection Māori share within whānau, hapū and Iwi systems.

Our goal is to convey in a powerful and unique way, what UNICEF Aotearoa stands for. We’re standing up for children’s rights in everything we do. It’s about equality, inclusion and recognising that culture is a taonga (treasure) to be cherished.

Axel, Hawaki and Te Waipuna performing 'Ka Mate'. 
'Ka Mate' is a haka, originally composed by Te Rauparaha, a Chief of Ngāti Toa Rangatira. We acknowldege Ngāti Toa Rangatira as the kaitiaki of this taonga - 'Ka Mate".

We are committed to honouring Te Tiriti o Waitangi (the Treaty of Waitangi) and recognise the status of Māori as Tangata whenua, and the need for organisations such as ours (Tangata Tiriti) to work together with Māori in partnership for outcomes in the participation, potential and, protection of all Tamariki and Rangatahi throughout Aotearoa.

In Aotearoa, you'll now see us using our new name UNICEF Aotearoa | mo nga tamariki katoa.

We are proud to unveil a new name and brand identity, reflecting the mahi we do every day to protect tamariki in Aotearoa, the Pacific and around the world.

Our new name

Our role as UNICEF Aotearoa is to be kaitiaki o ngā uri o āpōpō.
Guardians of the generations of tomorrow.



We are committed to honouring Te Tiriti o Waitangi (the Treaty of Waitangi) and recognise the status of Māori as Tangata whenua, and the need for organisations such as ours (Tangata Tiriti) to work together with Māori in partnership for outcomes in the participation, potential and, protection of all Tamariki and Rangatahi throughout Aotearoa.

We support te reo Māori revitalisation  and want to ensure that te reo Māori is more visible, particularly for our tamariki and rangatahi (young people). We also value the importance of a Tikanga based approach in how we engage with Māori; and appreciate the significant role and connection Māori share within whānau, hapū and Iwi systems.

Our goal is to convey in a powerful and unique way, what UNICEF Aotearoa stands for. We’re standing up for children’s rights in everything we do. It’s about equality, inclusion and recognising that culture is a taonga (treasure) to be cherished.

In Aotearoa, you'll now see us using our new name UNICEF Aotearoa | mo nga tamariki katoa.

We are proud to unveil a new name and brand identity, reflecting the mahi we do every day to protect tamariki in Aotearoa, the Pacific and around the world.

Our new name

Our role as UNICEF Aotearoa is to be kaitiaki o ngā uri o āpōpō.
Guardians of the generations of tomorrow.


We support te reo Māori revitalisation  and want to ensure that te reo Māori is more visible, particularly for our tamariki and rangatahi (young people). We also value the importance of a Tikanga based approach in how we engage with Māori; and appreciate the significant role and connection Māori share within whānau, hapū and Iwi systems.

Our goal is to convey in a powerful and unique way, what UNICEF Aotearoa stands for. We’re standing up for children’s rights in everything we do. It’s about equalityinclusion and recognising that culture is a taonga (treasure) to be cherished.

Axel, Hawaki and Te Waipuna performing the Haka 'Ka Mate'. 
'Ka Mate' is a haka, originally composed by Te Rauparaha, a Chief of Ngāti Toa Rangatira.
We acknowldege Ngāti Toa Rangatira as the kaitiaki of their taonga - 'Ka Mate".

We are committed to honouring Te Tiriti o Waitangi (the Treaty of Waitangi) and recognise the status of Māori as Tangata whenua, as well as the need for organisations such as ours (Tangata Tiriti) to work together with Māori in partnership for outcomes in the participation, potential and, protection of all Tamariki and Rangatahi throughout Aotearoa.

In Aotearoa, you'll now see us using our new name
UNICEF Aotearoa | mo nga tamariki katoa

We are proud to unveil a new name and brand identity, reflecting the mahi we do every day to protect tamariki in Aotearoa, the Pacific and around the world.

Our new name

At the heart of the Te Hiringa Tamariki framework,
are four key pou (drivers).

We respect Māori and Non-Māori ways of living and value each other’s differences. We want every child to flourish, have positive relationships and bright futures. By protecting our children, we are also protecting our aspirations, our whakapapa and our mana.

We want all tamariki to see their culture reflected in the world around them so they feel valued. In 2018, we developed Te Hiringa Tamariki – the first Māori well-being model with a specific focus on tamariki.

Our name reflects our commitment to incorporating bicultural values into our organisation. We recognise the bicultural history of Aotearoa and acknowledge the importance of Te Ao Māori and Te Ao Pākehā and the perspective they provide for our Tamariki and Rangatahi who navigate between both worlds.

The Power of Change

We respect Māori and Non-Māori ways of living and value each other’s differences. We want every child to flourish, have positive relationships and bright futures. By protecting our children, we are also protecting our aspirations, our whakapapa and our mana.

We want all tamariki to see their culture reflected in the world around them so they feel valued. In 2018, we developed Te Hiringa Tamariki – the first Māori well-being model with a specific focus on tamariki.

Our name reflects our commitment to incorporating bicultural values into our organisation. We recognise the bicultural history of Aotearoa and acknowledge the importance of Te Ao Māori and Te Ao Pākehā and the perspective they provide for our Tamariki and Rangatahi who navigate between both worlds.

The Power of Change

At the heart of the Te Hiringa Tamariki framework, are four key pou (drivers).

Te Ao
Flourishing in two worlds.
Bicultural, Multi-cultural

Aroha
Positive relationships,
harmony among whanau

Ihi
High octane energy or taiohe.
Leadership is nurtured.

Atua
Connected to the belief
of our ancestors.



A core component of UNICEF Aotearoa’ visual identity is our three tohu. The tohu celebrate our connection to Aotearoa and our commitment to Māori, New Zealand’s indigenous people.

Each of our tohu hold a specific meaning, which relates to the
context in which it is used.

Protecting children, and helping parents to give their tamariki the best start in life, these foundational goals of UNICEF are at the heart of Māori culture where whakapapa is so important. Whakapapa is the lens through which Māori understand the world. Everything has whakapapa - a history that describes how it came to be and how it is connected to other people, places and phenomena in the natural world.

We want all tamariki to see their culture reflected in the world around them so they feel valued. It's whakapapa and the essence of our Te Hiringa Tamariki pou which have informed the development of new cultural design elements as part of our new brand positioning developed by: Indigenous Design Agency IDIA

“The key challenge was – how do we develop visual elements that help to tell this new story of UNICEF Aotearoa in a meaningful way?” says IDIA. “We chose to illustrate the new identity with design elements that connect UNICEF with Māori and to our whānau across the Pacific.”

Our New Brand Identity

A core component of UNICEF Aotearoa’ visual identity is our three tohu. The tohu celebrate our connection to Aotearoa and our commitment to Māori, New Zealand’s indigenous people.

Each of our tohu hold a specific meaning,
which relates to the context in which it is used.

Protecting children, and helping parents to give their tamariki the best start in life, these foundational goals of UNICEF are at the heart of Māori culture where whakapapa is so important. Whakapapa is the lens through which Māori understand the world. Everything has whakapapa - a history that describes how it came to be and how it is connected to other people, places and phenomena in the natural world.

We want all tamariki to see their culture reflected in the world around them so they feel valued. It's whakapapa and the essence of our Te Hiringa Tamariki pou which have informed the development of new cultural design elements as part of our new brand positioning developed by: Indigenous Design Agency IDIA

“The key challenge was – how do we develop visual elements that help to tell this new story of UNICEF Aotearoa in a meaningful way?” says IDIA. “We chose to illustrate the new identity with design elements that connect UNICEF with Māori and to our whānau across the Pacific.”

Our New Brand Identity

A core component of UNICEF Aotearoa’ visual identity is our three tohu. The tohu celebrate our connection to Aotearoa and our commitment to Māori, New Zealand’s indigenous people.

Each of our tohu hold a specific meaning,
which relates to the context in which it is used.

Protecting children, and helping parents to give their tamariki the best start in life, these foundational goals of UNICEF are at the heart of Māori culture where whakapapa is so important. Whakapapa is the lens through which Māori understand the world. Everything has whakapapa - a history that describes how it came to be and how it is connected to other people, places and phenomena in the natural world.

We want all tamariki to see their culture reflected in the world around them so they feel valued. It's whakapapa and the essence of our Te Hiringa Tamariki pou which have informed the development of new cultural design elements as part of our new brand positioning developed by: Indigenous Design Agency IDIA

“The key challenge was – how do we develop visual elements that help to tell this new story of UNICEF Aotearoa in a meaningful way?” says IDIA. “We chose to illustrate the new identity with design elements that connect UNICEF with Māori and to our whānau across the Pacific.”

Our New Brand Identity

Our Tohu

The notched line (ngau) is a unique design element found both in Toi Māori (Māori art) and art from the wider Pacific. The term ‘ngau’, which means to bite or gnaw in the Māori language, refers to how the notched line appears as if small bite marks have been made into a carving.

The ngau line is particularly prominent as a feature in carving where it is used to create the shape of 
karu (eyes). It is with this context in mind that we draw on the ngau line, as the eye or the matapihi (window) through which UNICEF Aotearoa sees the world.

Te Matapihi

paepaeroa is a woven Māori cloak that features a broad taniko (triangular) ornamental border. This cloak form was chosen as an appropriate tohu to use across our images because its practical use, to provide protection and warmth, relates to our goals.

The word 
paepae also means ‘threshold’. So in the context of how we apply this tohu as a framing element over photos, the paepaeroa also provides a protective threshold. The taniko pattern, seen in the triangular forms, is known as niho taniwha and relates to chiefly lineage and genealogy.

Rectangle

Paepaeroa

The poutama (steps) design element is derived from the Māori narrative of Tane and the acquisition of the three baskets of knowledge. In this narrative Tane ascended to the heavens to retrieve the baskets.

Thus the poutama steps denote Tanes upward climb. In Toi Māori this pattern is prominent as a woven 
tukutuku panel design in Māori meeting houses. However it is now used widely by Māori in a number of contexts that generally relate to education and striving towards ones goals.

Azure, Rectangle, Font

Poutama

paepaeroa is a woven Māori cloak that features a broad taniko (triangular) ornamental border. This cloak form was chosen as an appropriate tohu to use across our images because its practical use, to provide protection and warmth, relates to our goals.

The word 
paepae also means ‘threshold’. So in the context of how we apply this tohu as a framing element over photos, the paepaeroa also provides a protective threshold. The taniko pattern, seen in the triangular forms, is known as niho taniwha and relates to chiefly lineage and genealogy.

Rectangle

Paepaeroa

The poutama (steps) design element is derived from the Māori narrative of Tane and the acquisition of the three baskets of knowledge. In this narrative Tane ascended to the heavens to retrieve the baskets.

Thus the poutama steps denote Tanes upward climb. In Toi Māori this pattern is prominent as a woven 
tukutuku panel design in Māori meeting houses. However it is now used widely by Māori in a number of contexts that generally relate to education and striving towards ones goals.

Azure, Rectangle, Font

Poutama

UNICEF Aotearoa is one of 33 National Committees.We make life better for all tamariki by advocating for the rights of children in Aotearoa, partnering with the New Zealand Government to deliver programs to tamariki in the Pacific and raising funds for UNICEF’s worldwide emergency and development work.

The notched line (ngau) is a unique design element found both in Toi Māori (Māori art) and art from the wider Pacific. The term ‘ngau’, which means to bite or gnaw in the Māori language, refers to how the notched line appears as if small bite marks have been made into a carving.

The ngau line is particularly prominent as a feature in carving where it is used to create the shape of 
karu (eyes). It is with this context in mind that we draw on the ngau line, as the eye or the matapihi (window) through which UNICEF Aotearoa sees the world.

Te Matapihi

Our Tohu

paepaeroa is a woven Māori cloak that features a broad taniko (triangular) ornamental border. This cloak form was chosen as an appropriate tohu to use across our images because its practical use, to provide protection and warmth, relates to our goals.

The word 
paepae also means ‘threshold’. So in the context of how we apply this tohu as a framing element over photos, the paepaeroa also provides a protective threshold. The taniko pattern, seen in the triangular forms, is known as niho taniwha and relates to chiefly lineage and genealogy.

Paepaeroa

The poutama (steps) design element is derived from the Māori narrative of Tane and the acquisition of the three baskets of knowledge. In this narrative Tane ascended to the heavens to retrieve the baskets.

Thus the poutama steps denote Tanes upward climb. In Toi Māori this pattern is prominent as a woven 
tukutuku panel design in Māori meeting houses. However it is now used widely by Māori in a number of contexts that generally relate to education and striving towards ones goals.

Poutama

UNICEF Aotearoa is one of 33 National Committees.We make life better for all tamariki by advocating for the rights of children in Aotearoa, partnering with the New Zealand Government to deliver programs to tamariki in the Pacific and raising funds for UNICEF’s worldwide emergency and development work.

UNICEF Aotearoa is one of 33 National Committees.We make life better for all tamariki by advocating for the rights of children in Aotearoa, partnering with the New Zealand Government to deliver programs to tamariki in the Pacific and raising funds for UNICEF’s worldwide emergency and development work.